Our Team

A PROVEN LEADERSHIP TEAM

The REVOLUTION Medicines team consists of accomplished leaders in building and operating exceptional life science companies.

Management Team

Mark grew up around academic medical centers and knew early on that he would devote his professional life to medical science on behalf of patients. After studying biology and science in human affairs at Princeton University, he pursued a dual career in clinical medicine and scientific research through the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). After postgraduate training at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School and UCSF, Mark joined the faculty of the UCSF School of Medicine, led a dynamic research laboratory within the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology focused on the pathogenesis of and discovery of new treatments for life-threatening viral diseases, and taught and practiced medicine at the San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF. He co-authored 85 scientific publications and is co-inventor on multiple issued patents and applications. He also served as assistant director of the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology and was consultant and collaborator to a variety of small and large biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.

Mark has also been active in business since childhood, negotiating his first significant technology deal while a graduate student. After a productive career in academia, he was recruited to the private sector, where he served in senior management roles in private and public biotechnology companies, including Genencor International and Constellation Pharmaceuticals, where he drove the development of an industry-leading strategic alliance with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group. Prior to REVOLUTION Medicines, he served as chief executive officer of four companies spanning early discovery through full development. He also served as senior executive-in-residence at Prospect Venture Partners. In 2012, Mark joined Third Rock Ventures full-time to lead its West Coast operations and design, launch and build new biotech companies. As partner, he led the collaboration with David Pompliano, Marty Burke and others that gave rise to REVOLUTION Medicines. In 2015, Mark transitioned into a part-time venture partner position at Third Rock Ventures so that he could focus on building and leading REVOLUTION Medicines as its full-time CEO.

Mark holds an A.B. from Princeton University and an M.D. and Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from UCSF. In addition to his role at REVOLUTION Medicines, he serves as chairman of the board for Constellation Pharmaceuticals and a board director for Igenica Biotherapeutics.

Realizing he wasn’t good enough to make a career out of playing rugby or soccer Steve went to medical school. Training as an academic hematologic oncologist in London and working as a clinician scientist at Barts and the London before joining the pharmaceutical industry in 2000, Steve was always motivated to have science drive the discovery of novel therapies. In London, he ran a clinical practice treating patients with leukemias and lymphomas in a research-focused environment, ran a research laboratory doing both basic and translational research and taught hematology to medical students. After two years of leading the clinical development of Sutent® for Pharmacia/SUGEN, he joined Genentech where he became vice president of hematology/oncology, playing a significant role in the development of key products such as Perjeta®, Kadcyla® and Erivedge® as well as other molecules in the company’s oncology portfolio. He then led the development of imetelstat, a first-in-class telomerase inhibitor, at Geron where he served as head of research and development and chief medical officer. Following his time at Geron, Steve served as president of Onkaido Therapeutics, a Moderna Venture focusing on discovery and development of mRNA therapeutics for cancer. During his 17 years in the biotechnology industry, Steve has worked with small molecules, antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, DNA oligonucleotides and mRNA platforms and has driven multiple industry and industry-academia collaborations as part of the mission to provide better drugs for patients with cancer. He has a passion for building and leading high-functioning teams doing groundbreaking cancer research.

Steve graduated with bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery degrees (MB ChB) and doctorate of medicine (M.D.) from the University of Birmingham, U.K. He is a fellow of both the Royal College of Physicians (FRCP) of London and the Royal College of Pathologists (FRCPath), U.K. He has over 100 peer-reviewed publications spanning cell biology, drug discovery, drug development and patient care, and is a named inventor on several patents. He now watches more soccer than he plays.

Peg initially studied pharmacy, but shortly into that five-year educational program decided to advance her education by attending either medical or law school. A lawyer-professor at her pharmacy school tailored an independent legal study course for her, sealing her fate. She completed pharmacy school and then studied law at Villanova Law School. While still in law school, she worked part-time in DuPont’s legal department and subsequently joined the company counseling its pharmaceutical division. During her tenure there, she set a pharmaceutical division record for most patent applications filed in one month (12). 

Led by an entrepreneurial spirit and a desire to see more of the country, she moved to San Francisco. Once there, she embarked on a 25-year adventure in biotechnology, working at both large/public companies (Genencor International and Kosan Biosciences) and small, privately held companies (Cogentus and ProLynx). Through years of corporate experience, international business transactions and worldwide litigation, Peg’s role evolved from patent counsel to general counsel and secretary. At Genencor, she led the legal effort for its IPO (in 2000) and later a multiparty M&A process that resulted in the company’s privatization and acquisition by a multinational conglomerate. Throughout her career, Peg has held multiple senior vice president positions in legal, business and corporate development.

Peg holds a B.S. in pharmacy and a J.D., as well as an executive M.B.A. She is a member of the Pennsylvania and California bars and is a registered patent attorney with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. She is a registered pharmacist in Pennsylvania.

Adrian aspires to not only be a great medicinal chemistry leader, but a leader of great medicinal chemists. Adrian has over 20 years experience in roles of increasing scientific responsibility and across a diverse range of disease areas in both large pharma and biotech environments, having worked previously for Roche, Astex Therapeutics and more recently, AstraZeneca where he has been the head of medicinal chemistry for the CVMD iMed.

During his career to date, Adrian has been heavily involved in the identification of over 15 clinical candidates across a variety of disease areas including AT7519 and AT9283, which are in Phase 2 development for a range of human cancers, and AZD4017 for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Adrian was also a core member of the cell cycle kinase alliance between Astex and Novartis that ultimately led to the discovery of LEE001 (ribociclib), the CDK4/6 inhibitor recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of HR+/HER2- advanced breast cancer. In addition, Adrian has authored 20 publications in peer-reviewed journals and is a named inventor on 27 small molecule patent applications. Adrian received his Ph.D. from the University of Sussex, U.K. in synthetic methodology towards the total synthesis of rapamycin and has a bachelor’s degree in applied chemistry from the University of Salford, U.K.

Wally has spent the last 30 years leveraging technology to deliver insights, foster collaboration, enhance business processes and improve efficiency. He played a key role in the early development of a number of molecular modeling software companies and did research in computational chemistry as an independent contractor at Sterling Winthrop, Eastman Kodak, and Sanofi.

Seeking a broader impact on research, Wally moved into research informatics, leading the implementation of decision support systems for drug discovery at Chiron, Affymax and Exelixis. Most recently, he held the position of vice president of information technology (IT) at Exelixis, where he delivered a number of major infrastructure projects, including the successful re-implementation of the company’s SAP ERP system.

Wally earned his Ph.D. in computational chemistry from Harvard University in the laboratory of Martin Karplus, 2013 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. He holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego.

 

Jan is an experienced molecular pharmacologist with a focus in small molecule drug discovery across diverse target classes and therapeutic areas including CNS, gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases. She has 20 years of research and development experience from Theravance, and prior to that, Roche, leading the advancement of several novel drug candidates through discovery into early clinical Phase 1/2 development. Jan conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California, Irvine and at the Sandoz Institute for Medical Research, London, U.K. 

Jan has authored over 30 publications in peer-reviewed journals. She received her Ph.D. from University of Cambridge, U.K. and her bachelor's degree in biochemistry from University of Bath, U.K.

Luan enjoys working with people and building great teams. She knows it takes excellent leadership, ongoing collaboration and an engaging environment to build a successful organization and culture. Early in her career, with an economics degree fresh in hand, she was offered a position in a private banking training program with a financial services company. Instead, with the desire to learn about growing strong teams within an organization, she requested the operations/human resources program. From the financial services industry, she transitioned into technology, and eventually into biotechnology, joining Gilead Sciences where she oversaw talent acquisition by directly recruiting for the scientific and clinical functions, led the compensation and employee benefits programs, and managed the human resources due diligence and task integration group for an early acquisition target.

Since her work at Gilead Sciences, Luan has run her own full-service human resources consulting firm, working with numerous organizations across biotechnology, public health, non-profit and high technology fields. This work included growing their staff, coaching their leaders on the importance of leadership and communication, and implementing key human resources functions and processes for their unique business cultures. Luan has also held executive human resources roles, most recently with Audience, Inc., where she was vice president of human resources, leading the function from the pre-IPO stage through an IPO.

Luan received her professional coaching certification through New Ventures West and holds an economics degree from Santa Clara University and a master’s degree in business administration from Golden Gate University. Luan continues to read and study the art of building exceptional teams and cultures. 

Academic Founders

Marty grew up dreaming of becoming a doctor or a major league baseball player. The Orioles never called, but Johns Hopkins University did, and so he jumped at the chance. At Hopkins he also discovered a passion for chemistry and its interface with human health. So he next moved to Boston/Cambridge to pursue science and medicine in parallel at Harvard Medical School, Harvard University and MIT. He is now Professor of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Marty’s lab is pioneering the development of molecular prosthetics, small molecules that serve as functional surrogates for missing proteins. To enable this research, he has developed a powerful Lego-like approach for making small molecules involving the iterative assembly of MIDA boronate building blocks, an approach that underlies REVOLUTION Medicines’ product engine. Leveraging this platform, his group has synthesized, understood, and/or improved a variety of complex natural products that perform protein-like functions. This includes discovering the mechanism of action of amphotericin B and an atomistic roadmap to improving its therapeutic index.

Marty is the recipient of a number of honors and awards, including the Thieme IUPAC Prize in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, the IOCF Lectureship Award, the Hirata Memorial Gold Medal from Japan, the Early Career Scientist Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the American Chemical Society Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecturer, the American Chemical Society Elias J. Corey Award for Outstanding Original Contribution in Organic Synthesis by a Young Investigator, the American Chemical Society Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, the UIUC Innovation Discovery Award, the Novartis Chemistry Lectureship, the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation Young Investigator Award, a Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award, the Dreyfus Foundation New Faculty Award, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Unrestricted Research Grant in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, the Eli Lilly Grantee Award, the Amgen Young Investigator Award, the AstraZeneca Excellence in Chemistry Award, and he has been named "one of the world's 35 top innovators under age 35" by MIT Technology Review.

He holds a B.A. from Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. from Harvard University, and M.D. from Harvard Medical School and MIT.

With an interest in improving human health through drug discovery, Michael entered the graduate program in chemistry at Harvard. Surrounded by top chemistry talent, Michael became convinced that microorganisms were the best chemists on the planet and devoted the rest of his graduate career to studying how they go about their trade.

Michael is currently an associate professor in the department of bioengineering and therapeutic sciences at University of California, San Francisco and a member of the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences. The Fischbach group crunches big data to predict which microorganisms are making what molecules where, and uses a combination of microbiology, synthetic biology and chemistry to purify the molecules and characterize the role they play in human biology and disease. Previously, he was an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital coordinating a collaborative effort based at the Broad Institute to develop genomics-based approaches to the discovery of small molecules from microbes.

Michael is a recipient of numerous awards including the NIH Director's New Innovator Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease Award, the Byers Award in basic science, a Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging, and the Young Investigator Grant for Probiotics Research from the Global Probiotics Council.

Michael is a member of the scientific advisory boards of NGM Biopharmaceuticals and Symbiota, and a member of the board of directors of Achaogen.

Kevan is professor and chair of the department of cellular and molecular pharmacology at the University of California, San Francisco and professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. He is an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine.

Kevan is a pioneer in the development of chemical methods for investigating cellular signal transduction pathways—with a particular focus on protein kinases and lipid kinases. His laboratory uses a combination of chemical synthesis and protein engineering to create uniquely traceable and regulatable kinases, allowing the function of more than 100 different kinases to be uncovered across all disease areas including oncology, metabolism and infectious disease.

Kevan has received numerous awards for his work, including being named a Fellow of the Pew Foundation, Searle Foundation, Sloan Foundation, Glaxo-Wellcome Foundation and the Cotrell Foundation. He has also received the Eli Lilly Award, given to the most promising biological chemist in the country under the age of 37. 

He is a founder of Intellikine (acquired by Takeda) and Cellular Genomics (acquired by Gilead), co-founder of Araxes Pharmaceuticals, eFFECTOR Therapeutics and Mitokinin, LLC and a scientific advisor at Kura Oncology. 

Kevan received his B.S. in Chemistry from Reed College and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley.

 

Advisors

Julian is president, research and development at Infinity Pharmaceuticals. Prior to Infinity he was the senior vice president, drug discovery and development at Millennium Pharmaceuticals. He is a successful drug hunter having discovered and developed Velcade® (bortezomib), a proteasome inhibitor for cancer therapy while at ProScript Inc. (acquired by Millennium Pharmaecuticals). Earlier in his career, while at Boehring Ingelheim, he discovered the drug Viramune® (nevirapine) for HIV. 

Julian has received many awards, including the 2012 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize for his role in the discovery and development of bortezomib, the 2012 C. Chester Stock Award Lectureship from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and the 2001 Ribbon of Hope Award for Velcade® from the International Myeloma Foundation. He is an inventor on more than 40 patents and has authored over 100 papers and book chapters in peer-reviewed journals. Julian is on the board of directors of Warp Drive Bio and the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation and is on the scientific advisory boards of Cleave Biosciences and Stand Up to Cancer.

Julian received his B.S. from McGill University and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the field of synthetic organic chemistry.  

 

Trever is an associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a medical oncologist with a Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology. He maintains an active academic clinical practice and leads a basic and translational research laboratory focused on cancer genetics, precision medicine, and the molecular basis of targeted therapy response and resistance. Trever’s research has led to the discovery of several mechanisms of resistance to EGFR-targeted therapy, BRAF- and MEK-targeted therapy, and ALK-targeted therapy in lung and other cancers. 

Trever is the recipient of numerous awards including the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, the Pew-Stewert Scholar Award, the Searle Scholars Award, the Doris Duke Clinical Scientist Development Award and is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Trever attended the New York University School of Medicine where he received his M.D. and Ph.D.

Eric's mother was very afraid of the chemistry set he received as a gift. "This must be powerful stuff," Eric concluded. Thus, Eric began a life-long love affair with chemistry, drug discovery and chasing innovation.

Eric became a well-known medicinal chemist, a senior drug discovery executive, biotech entrepreneur, venture capital investor, science-stage biotech consultant, and consulting Stanford professor. He now has 40 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry (18), biotech startups (10), venture investing (11) and academia (2) and has had close involvement in the discovery/development of five approved drugs (plus three drugs in Phase 3 development), and has participated in the founding/co-founding five companies, two of which were sold to big pharma.

Eric is an accepted authority on medicinal chemistry, antibiotic / natural product chemistry and creating drugs through enzyme inhibition. He has authored more than 200 scientific manuscripts and U.S. patents, and portions of three books, including editing a comprehensive book on combinatorial chemistry. He is the senior author of two manuscripts, which during 1994-1996, were the most frequently cited chemistry papers in the world. For the 32-year period 1975-2007, these two papers were the number two and three most cited papers to appear in Journal of Medicinal-Chemistry.

In 1997 he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in medicinal chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and conducted post-doctoral work at Yale University. Eric is also a practicing artist and is awaiting his first exhibit in March. He is a lifelong Yankee fan, but is old enough to have attended Woodstock, the Beatles concert at Shea Stadium in 1965 and the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago.

John is a professor of biochemistry & molecular biology in the department of molecular & cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Howard Hughes Investigator, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and was elected a Foreign Member of the Royal Society, London (2015). John’s research focuses on the structure and mechanism of the enzymes and molecular switches that carry out cellular signal transduction.  

John is the recipient of many awards, including the 2005 Richard Lounsbery Award, US National Academy of Science and the 2009 Merck Award, American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for his contributions to structural biology. He is an academic founder of Nurix Pharmaceuticals and a member of the Advisory Board of Carmot Therapeutics and Amgen, Inc.  

John received his B.S. from Juniata College and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The desire to turn the technology of the futuristic science fiction stories that David read as a boy into reality compelled him into a life of science. David studied physical and bioorganic chemistry as a graduate student, before finding his true passion -- how evolution acts at the molecular level -- as an enzymology and molecular biology postdoctoral in Jeremy Knowles’ lab. Most of his career has been spent devising new ways to find or to design novel compounds that are not cross-resistant with existing therapeutic agents.

David has served as a senior pharmaceutical executive at GlaxoSmithKline and Merck, where he led drug discovery teams that produced preclinical credentials for more than 30 development candidates and four approved therapies, including the anti-infective Altabax and oncology drugs Tykerb, Votrient and Promacta. He has also been devoted to discovering cost-effective medicines for diseases of the developing world, for which he was recognized with GlaxoSmithKline’s highest honor, the Corporate Executive Team Leadership Award. Subsequently he served as chief executive officer of BioLeap, a venture capital-backed discovery stage platform technology company.

In 2013, he joined Third Rock Ventures as entrepreneur-in-residence to design and build exceptional companies that apply the science of human-microbe interactions to discover and deliver new medicines and diagnostic tools. During this time, he initiated a project that led to REVOLUTION Medicines and played a key role in its conceptualization, design and launch.

David holds a B.S. from the University of Virginia and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University, and was a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. As principal and owner of Sanderling Consulting LLC, he advised clients on drug discovery and development strategy and process, and serves on the scientific advisory boards of several biotechnology companies, philanthropies and governmental organizations.

Board of Directors

Alexis grew up in Madison, Wisconsin, deeply embedded in the lab from a young age, at least if that includes sticking your finger in the vortex machines. Wanting to invent matter-antimatter propulsion, Alexis first started on the path of physics, but then fell in love with biology, chemistry and entrepreneurship. A successful serial company builder with more than 20 years of experience launching and operating innovative science-based organizations, Alexis is now a partner and integral member of Third Rock Ventures, and focuses on the formation, development and strategy of new companies. He has played key roles in launching and building several of Third Rock's portfolio companies including, board member and former interim CEO of Blueprint Medicines, board member at Editas Medicine, chairman of the board and former interim CEO at Warp Drive Bio, and co-founder, former interim CEO and chairman of the board at Foundation Medicine. Prior to joining Third Rock Ventures, Alexis founded CombinatoRx in 2000, serving as its chief executive officer and bringing the company public on NASDAQ. He has raised more than $1 billion in financing and business development deals, and has authored numerous scientific papers and patents. He was honored as the MIT Technology Review Innovator of the Year, the New England Entrepreneur of the Year in Life Sciences and as a Presidential Scholar. He serves on the board of the National Venture Capital Association, has served on the board of the Biotechnology Industry Organization and is a trustee at the Boston Museum of Science.

Alexis holds a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Chicago, and completed his graduate training in chemistry and chemical biology as a Howard Hughes Predoctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Stuart Schreiber at Harvard University.

Larry Lasky, Ph.D., a partner at The Column Group since 2014, has been an influential scientist in biotechnology for over 35 years. He was a founding scientist of Genetics Institute (later acquired by Wyeth), one of the earliest biotechnology companies. Subsequently he was a leading scientist at Genentech for 20 years where he contributed in various disciplines including vaccinology, immunology, stem cell biology, cellular signaling mechanisms and monoclonal antibody therapy of tumors. He was appointed a Genentech fellow, the company’s highest scientific position.

Prior to joining The Column Group, Larry was with US Venture Partners and was the founding investor of Cleave Biosciences and led the firm’s participation in Intellikine (acquired by Takeda/MLNM) and Calithera Biosciences. As a general partner and co-founder of Latterell Venture Partners from 2002 to 2007, Larry was the founding investor of Proteolix (acquired by Onyx Pharmaceuticals) and OncoMed Pharmaceuticals and was instrumental in the founding of Cellective Therapeutics (acquired by Medimmune), Tetralogic and BioVerdant.  

Larry has been a lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business and currently sits on the board of directors of Carmot Therapeutics, eFFECTOR Pharmaceuticals, Ribon Therapeutics, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, Peloton Therapeutics and OncoMed Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:OMED). He is also on the board of trustees of SFJAZZ.

An avid jazz and classical musician, Larry earned a B.A. in music and Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of California, Los Angeles and completed his post-doctoral studies at the California Institute of Technology.

Mark grew up around academic medical centers and knew early on that he would devote his professional life to medical science on behalf of patients. After studying biology and science in human affairs at Princeton University, he pursued a dual career in clinical medicine and scientific research through the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). After postgraduate training at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School and UCSF, Mark joined the faculty of the UCSF School of Medicine, led a dynamic research laboratory within the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology focused on the pathogenesis of and discovery of new treatments for life-threatening viral diseases, and taught and practiced medicine at the San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF. He co-authored 85 scientific publications and is co-inventor on multiple issued patents and applications. He also served as assistant director of the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology and was consultant and collaborator to a variety of small and large biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.

Mark has also been active in business since childhood, negotiating his first significant technology deal while a graduate student. After a productive career in academia, he was recruited to the private sector, where he served in senior management roles in private and public biotechnology companies, including Genencor International and Constellation Pharmaceuticals, where he drove the development of an industry-leading strategic alliance with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group. Prior to REVOLUTION Medicines, he served as chief executive officer of four companies spanning early discovery through full development. He also served as senior executive-in-residence at Prospect Venture Partners. Since 2012 Mark has been a partner in Third Rock Ventures and leader of its West Coast operations. He led the collaboration with David Pompliano, Marty Burke and others that gave rise to REVOLUTION Medicines.

Mark holds an A.B. from Princeton University and an M.D. and Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from UCSF. In addition to his role at REVOLUTION Medicines, he serves as chairman of the board for Constellation Pharmaceuticals and a board director for Igenica Biotherapeutics.

Mike, former Partner at Third Rock Ventures, was the chief executive officer and director of Cubist Pharmaceuticals from 2003 until his retirement at the year-end of 2014. Under Mike's leadership Cubist grew from a struggling micro-cap to the world's leading antibiotic company. Cubist was acquired by Merck early in 2015. He joined Cubist as president and chief operating officer in 2002. He was was vice president of sales and marketing at Biogen from 1995-2001 where he built Biogen's commercial infrastructure for the launch of the company's first product. Prior to Biogen he spent 11+ years at Zeneca Pharmaceuticals (and predecessor companies) in a range of commercial, operating and strategic roles, ending his career there as national business director. 

Mike currently chairs the boards of Alnylam Pharmaceuticals and Bates College. He is also a member of the boards of CELGENE Corporation, Global Blood Therapeutics, Tekla Capital Management (closed end mutual fund complex), Gulf of Maine Research Institute, and the Whitehead Institute of Biomedical Research. 

He is an advisor to the prime minister of Cameron Commission on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and was involved in the creation of the GAIN act (enacted in the US in 2012 to encourage investment in antimicrobials with activity against resistant bacteria). 

Mike was a regional winner and national finalist (2013) in the life science segment of Ernst & Young's Entrepreneur of the Year; was a finalist (2011) in DJ/Morningside CEO of the Year and was recognized as the Top CEO in Massachusetts by the Boston Globe (2008).

With degrees in engineering and finance and an early career in the chemicals industry, Liz soon discovered her passion for bringing innovative medicines to market to prevent or treat life-threatening disease. Applying a strong analytic framework, strategic discipline and commercial experience in leading high growth businesses, she brings a deep commitment to partnerships with R&D and operating colleagues to benefit patients.

Liz previously served as the worldwide vice president and commercial leader in the infectious diseases and vaccines global commercial strategy organization at Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a Johnson & Johnson company. In this role, she led strategy, global commercialization and market access for the respiratory infections, HIV, sexually transmitted infections and bacterial pathogens portfolios. Ms. Anderson also helped develop and execute Janssen’s first global vaccines strategy and played a key role in the acquisition of vaccines company Crucell N.V. She held several leadership positions within Johnson & Johnson, including worldwide vice president, immunology & respiratory, global strategic marketing, and worldwide vice president, global strategic marketing for the biotechnology, immunology and oncology business unit. Liz played key roles in the launch or life cycle management of important Janssen brands, including STELARA, SIMPONI, VELCADE and REMICADE, in the development of numerous early and medium-stage compounds and in the advancement of therapeutic area and company strategies. During her tenure, she served on the Centocor, Inc. and Crucell management boards, the Centyrex and Betalogics internal venture boards, the BIO R&D management board and the Pharmaceuticals Group development committee.

Prior to joining Johnson & Johnson, Liz was the vice president and general manager of Wyeth Vaccines from 1997 to 2002, where she played a key role in the launch of PREVNAR, a first-in-class vaccine that achieved $1 billion in sales within 18 months of introduction, the most successful launch in the 75-year history of Wyeth and for which she received the President’s Award. Earlier in her career, Liz served as the vice president and general manager for the U.S. biopharmaceuticals business of Rhone Poulenc Rorer and as the vice president of plasma operations for the American National Red Cross.

Liz holds a B.S. in engineering from Rutgers College of Engineering and an M.B.A. in finance from the Sellinger School of Business and Management at Loyola University in Maryland. She serves on the board of directors of Bavarian Nordic A/S, the board of trustees of The Haverford School, the Bryn Mawr Hospital Foundation and The Wistar Institute, a leading biomedical research organization, and serves as a consultant and advisor and as a guest lecturer at Wharton.